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12 Feb 2019 Update: As MyEtherWallet has today completely changed their web interface, to follow this guide you will need to access their previous interface at https://vintage.myetherwallet.com/signmsg.html. Apologies for the impeccable timing!

Signing a message with your Ethereum address helps us to verify that you indeed own the Ethereum address that was part of the TENX token snapshot taken on 30 December 2018. This is because you can sign a message only when you have connected to your Ethereum wallet.

Make sure to check it’s the authentic MyEtherWallet website.

Step 1: Go to https://vintage.myetherwallet.com/signmsg.html

Step 2: Enter any unique message of your choice.

Example: My name is Solomon. I am signing a message to participate in the TENX token claim.

Q: What message do I use?

You may input any message you’d like. The text you input here, together with your public key, creates a unique generated signature that serves as a ‘receipt’ of your signed message. This ‘receipt’ is what we need to verify your Ethereum address.

Q: Can I choose not to include a name or nickname?

Sure, you can leave that out! We do not need your name or nickname to verify your Ethereum address. Any text you input here, together with your public key, creates a unique generated signature that serves as a ‘receipt’ of your signed message, which is used to verify your Ethereum address.

Step 3: Connect to the wallet you used to participate in the snapshot.

Q: What if my wallet is not shown in the list on MyEtherWallet?

For Exodus: You’ll have to first get access to your private key with these steps. Then, connect to your wallet using the ‘Private Key’ option.

For Jaxx: Connect to your Jaxx wallet using your 12-word (Mnemonic) seed phrase. Learn more here.

For other wallets: You can connect to your wallet using your private key, 12-word (Mnemonic) seed phrase, or Keystore file.

Q: If I used a hardware wallet (e.g. Trezor or Ledger) for the 30 December snapshot, do I need to connect to my hardware wallet?

Yes, you will need to do so to sign a message.

Step 4: Click the ‘Sign Message’ button.

Then, confirm the sign message on your wallet or browser, depending on your wallet.

Q: I’m using a Ledger, and didn’t get the browser pop-up requesting to confirm the sign message. What do I do?

Solution 1: Enable ‘Browser support’ in your Ledger’s Ethereum application. Then, refresh the browser and repeat the previous steps. This time, you should be able to confirm your sign message.

Solution 2: Alternatively, update to the latest firmware 1.5.5 using these steps. Then, enable ‘Display data’ in your Ledger’s Ethereum application. Refresh the browser and repeat the previous steps, you should now be able to confirm your sign message.

Copy the full text in the generated Signature field.

Step 5: Finally, copy and save the text in the Signature field. Keep this private and secure.

Q: What is this text?

This is a unique generated signature created with your message and your public key. It serves as a ‘receipt’ of your signed message. You’ll need this full signature text for the TENX token claiming process happening later in Q1.

Q: Where do I save it?

Copy and paste the text any place you can retrieve the text again.

Q: What if I lose the signature?

If you do lose this text, you may sign another message with your Ethereum address to generate another signature.

Other FAQs

Q: When should I sign a message?

You can do this whenever you’d like. However, you’ll only need the signature when the TENX token claim process begins later in Q1.

Q: If my wallet interface allows me to sign a message directly, can I do it from the wallet instead of on MyEtherWallet?

Sure! We suggest MyEtherWallet as a universal option, and encourage you to use the interface you are most comfortable with.


If you have any further questions please…